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searching for Tudor period 312 found (1103 total)

alternate case: tudor period

Richard Hill (bishop) (179 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article

Richard Hill (fl. 10 May 1486; died 20 February 1496) was a medieval Bishop of London. Hill was Archdeacon of Lewes from 1486, until he was provided as
John Russell (bishop) (464 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Russell (died 30 December 1494) was an English Bishop of Rochester and bishop of Lincoln and Lord Chancellor. Russell was admitted to Winchester College
John Hales (bishop of Coventry and Lichfield) (600 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Hales (c. 1400-1490) (alias Hals, Halse, etc.) was Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield (1459-1490). He was one of the Worthies of Devon of the biographer
Thomas Bourchier (cardinal) (578 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Bourchier (c. 1411 – 30 March 1486) was a medieval English cardinal, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Lord Chancellor of England. Bourchier was a younger
Robert Morton (bishop) (408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Morton (1435 – May 1497) was an English priest and Bishop of Worcester. Morton was son of William Morton, Member of Parliament for Shaftesbury,
James Goldwell (341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Goldwell (died 15 February 1499) was a medieval Dean of Salisbury and Bishop of Norwich. Goldwell was one of the sons of William and Avice Goldwell
Peter Courtenay (1,051 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Peter Courtenay (c. 1432 – 23 September 1492) was Bishop of Exeter (1478-87) and Bishop of Winchester (1487-92), and also had a successful political career
William Bradbridge (629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Bradbridge (or Brodebridge) (1501–1578) was an English bishop of Exeter. He was born in London and took his B.A. degree at Magdalen College, Oxford
John Morton (cardinal) (1,292 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Morton (c. 1420 – 15 September 1500) was an English prelate who served as Archbishop of Canterbury from 1486 until his death and also Lord Chancellor
Thomas Mylling (66 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Mylling (or Milling) was a medieval Bishop of Hereford. He was nominated on 22 June 1474 and consecrated on 21 August 1474. He died about 12 January
Robert Stillington (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Stillington (1420 – May 1491) was Bishop of Bath and Wells (1465–1491) and a courtier under Edward IV of England. He twice served as Edward's Lord
Wives of Henry VIII (2,833 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In common parlance, the wives of Henry VIII were the six queens consort wedded to Henry between 1509 and his death in 1547. In legal terms, King Henry
English Virginalist School (285 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Virginal Book Anne Cromwell's Virginal Book Virginals Composers of the Tudor period Glyn, Margaret H. (1916–17). "The National School of Virginal Music in
Thomas Chaundler (590 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Chaundler (1418–1490) was an English playwright and illustrator. A manuscript at Trinity College, Cambridge, depicts Chaundler presenting one of
Mary of York (326 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary of York (11 August 1467 – 23 May 1482) was the second daughter of Edward IV of England and his queen consort Elizabeth Woodville. Mary of York was
John Sherwood (bishop) (425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Sherwood (or Shirwood; died 1494) was an English churchman and diplomat. Sherwood was the son of the common clerk John Shirwod of York and his first
James Blount (149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir James Blount (died 1493) (sometimes spelt Blunt) was commander of the English fortress of Hammes, near Calais. Blount was the son of Walter Blount
John Gunthorpe (911 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Gunthorpe (died 1498) was an English administrator, Clerk of the Parliament, Keeper of the Privy Seal and Dean of Wells. Gunthorpe was a student at
Ferrante Gonzaga (713 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ferrante I Gonzaga (also Ferdinando I Gonzaga; 28 January 1507 – 15 November 1557) was an Italian condottiero, a member of the House of Gonzaga and the
Edmund Allen (priest) (225 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Edmund Allen (or Edmond, or Alen, or Edmonde Aellen; c. 1519 – 1559) was an English clergyman and scholar. A native of Norfolk, England, Allen was elected
William Alley (545 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Alley (also Alleyn and Alleigh; 1510 – 15 April 1570) was an Anglican prelate who was the Bishop of Exeter during the reign of Queen Elizabeth
Neatham (440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neatham is a Roman hamlet in the civil parish of Alton in the East Hampshire district of Hampshire, England. Its nearest town is Alton,(where the 2011
Provinces of Ireland (3,390 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in 1660. The exact boundaries of the provinces of Ireland during the Tudor period changed several times, usually as a result of the creation of new counties:
John de la Pole, 1st Earl of Lincoln (1,126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John de la Pole, 1st Earl of Lincoln (c. 1460 – 16 June 1487) was a leading figure in the Yorkist aristocracy during the Wars of the Roses. After the death
Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland (901 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland KG (c. 1449 – 28 April 1489) was an English aristocrat during the Wars of the Roses. After losing his title when
Richard Bell (bishop) (116 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Richard Bell (died 1496) was a Bishop of Carlisle. He was selected 11 February 1478, and consecrated 26 April 1478. He resigned the see on 4 September
Cecily Neville, Duchess of York (2,585 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cecily Neville (3 May 1415 – 31 May 1495) was an English noblewoman, the wife of Richard, Duke of York (1411–1460), and the mother of two kings of England
Psalter (1,516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A psalter is a volume containing the Book of Psalms, often with other devotional material bound in as well, such as a liturgical calendar and litany of
Edmund Grey, 1st Earl of Kent (460 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edmund Grey, 1st Earl of Kent (26 October 1416 – 22 May 1490), English administrator, nobleman and magnate, was the son of Sir John Grey, KG and Constance
Elizabeth Woodville (4,402 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabeth Woodville (also spelled Wydville, Wydeville, or Widvile) (c. 1437 – 8 June 1492) was queen of England as the spouse of King Edward IV from 1464
Robert Aldrich (bishop) (277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Aldrich or Aldridge (died March 1555) was Bishop of Carlisle in the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary. Richard Aldrich was born at Burnham
John of Gloucester (883 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John of Gloucester (or John of Pontefract) (1468–1499 (based on historical hypothesis)) was a son of King Richard III of England. John is so called because
Francis Lovell, 1st Viscount Lovell (1,614 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Francis Lovell, 9th Baron Lovell, 6th Baron Holand, later 1st Viscount Lovell KG (1456 – probably 1487) was an English nobleman who was an ally of King
Mistresses of Henry VIII (722 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Mistresses of Henry VIII included many notable women between 1509 and 1536. They have been the subject of biographies, novels and films. Elizabeth
William Brandon (standard-bearer) (1,094 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir William Brandon (1456 – 22 August 1485) of Soham, Cambridgeshire was Henry Tudor's standard-bearer at the Battle of Bosworth, where he was killed by
Piers Butler, 8th Earl of Ormond (890 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Piers Butler, 8th Earl of Ormond, 1st Earl of Ossory (1467 – 26 August 1539) also known as (Irish Piers Ruadh) Red Piers, was from the Polestown branch
Anne Beauchamp, 16th Countess of Warwick (876 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anne Beauchamp, 16th Countess of Warwick (13 July 1426 – 20 September 1492) was the daughter of Richard Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick, and his second
Lady Margaret Butler (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lady Margaret Butler, Lady Boleyn (c. 1454 – 1539) was an Irish noblewoman, the daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond. She married
Jasper Tudor (2,880 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jasper Tudor, Duke of Bedford and Earl of Pembroke (c. November 1431 – 21/26 December 1495), also called Jasper of Hatfield, was the uncle of King Henry
Jan Łaski (620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jan Łaski or Johannes à Lasco (1499 – 8 January 1560) was a Polish Reformed reformer. Owing to his influential work in England (c. 1543–1555) during the
Catherine Woodville, Duchess of Buckingham (566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Catherine Woodville (also spelled Wydville, Wydeville, or Widvile) (c. 1458 – 18 May 1497) was an English medieval noblewoman. She was the sister-in-law
George Nevill, 4th Baron Bergavenny (355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Neville, or Nevill, 4th and de jure 2nd Baron Bergavenny (c.1440 – 20 September 1492) was an English nobleman. George Neville was the son of Edward
Hanworth, Norfolk (1,008 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hanworth is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 18.8 miles (30.3 km) north of Norwich, 5.4 miles (8.7 km) south-west
John Cabot (6,170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Cabot (Italian: Giovanni Caboto [dʒoˈvanni kaˈbɔːto]; c. 1450 – c. 1500) was an Italian navigator and explorer. His 1497 voyage to the coast of North
Miles Salley (374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Miles Salley (died 1516) was a late 15th-century Abbot of Eynsham Abbey and Abingdon Abbey and an early 16th-century Bishop of Llandaff. Salley was Abbot
William Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel (376 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel, 6th Baron Maltravers (23 November 1417 – 1487) was an English nobleman. Born on 23 November 1417, William was the
Rowland FitzEustace, 1st Baron Portlester (942 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rowland FitzEustace, 1st Baron Portlester (c. 1430 – 19 December 1496) was an Irish peer, statesman and judge. He was one of the dominant political figures
Richard Oldham (bishop) (244 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Catholicism portal Richard Oldham (died 1485/86) was a pre-Reformation cleric who served as the Bishop of Sodor and Man in the second half of the 15th
William Caxton (2,722 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Caxton (c. 1422 – c. 1491) was an English merchant, diplomat, and writer. He is thought to be the first person to introduce a printing press into
Eustace Chapuys (1,889 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eustace Chapuys ([østas ʃapɥi]; c. 1490/92 – 21 January 1556), the son of Louis Chapuys and Guigonne Dupuys, was a Savoyard diplomat who served Charles
Billington, Lancashire (296 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from Whalley Abbey following the dissolution of the monasteries in the Tudor period, but this has never been conclusively proven. In 798, early in his reign
History of Portsmouth (3,742 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Moleyns Bishop of Chichester was murdered while in Portsmouth. Through the Tudor period, Portsmouth's fortification's were subject to almost continuous reworking
Carew Castle (989 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Domestic Tudor-period ranges from across the mill pond to the northwest
William de Berkeley, 1st Marquess of Berkeley (855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William de Berkeley, 1st Marquess of Berkeley (1426 – 14 February 1492) was an English peer, given the epithet "The Waste-All" by the family biographer
Richard Pace (595 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Pace (c. 1482 – 28 June 1536) was an English diplomat of the Tudor period. He was born in Hampshire and educated at Winchester College under Thomas
William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (469 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (5 March 1451 – 16 July 1491) was an English nobleman and politician. He was the son of William Herbert, 1st Earl
Louis de Gruuthuse (1,338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Louis de Bruges, Lord of Gruuthuse, Prince of Steenhuijs, Earl of Winchester (Dutch: Lodewijk van Brugge; c. 1427 – 24 November 1492), was a Flemish courtier
Six (musical) (3,431 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Six is a British musical with book, music, and lyrics by Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss. The musical is a modern retelling of the lives of the six wives of
Richard Edwardes (512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Edwardes (also Edwards, 25 March 1525 – 31 October 1566) was an English poet, playwright, and composer; he was made a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal
John Seymour (died 1491) (530 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Seymour (c. 1450 – 26 October 1491) of Wulfhall, of Stalbridge, of Stinchcombe and of Huish, all in Wiltshire, England, was warden of Savernake Forest
Perkin Warbeck (3,987 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Perkin Warbeck (c. 1474 – 23 November 1499) was a pretender to the English throne. Warbeck claimed to be Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York, who was the
John Ingleby (bishop) (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Ingleby (1434–1499) was Bishop of Llandaff. Sir John was born on 7 July 1434, the only son of Sir William Ingleby of Ripley and Joan, daughter of
Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom (1,031 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lord High Admiral (of England, Great Britain and then the United Kingdom, beginning in the 14th century) is the titular head of the Royal Navy. Most
Margaret Ball (869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Ball (1515–1584) was a prominent member of 16th-century Irish society, who, despite being the widow of a Lord Mayor of Dublin, was arrested for
John Scrope, 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton (675 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Scrope, 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton, KG (22 July 1437 – 17 August 1498) was an English Yorkist nobleman. Born at Bolton Castle, Yorkshire, the eldest
Simon Mountford (died 1495) (418 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Simon Montford (died circa 30 January 1495) was an English Lord of several manors, who was executed for treason. Simon Montford was the son and heir
John Alen (1,164 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Alen (1476 – 28 July 1534) was an English priest and canon lawyer, whose later years were spent in Ireland. He held office as Archbishop of Dublin
Tadhg Mac Cárthaigh (1,356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tadhg Mac Cárthaigh (Latinised and anglicised Thaddeus McCarthy) c. 1455 – 25 October 1492, was an Irish ecclesiastic. He was a bishop who never ruled
John Cheyne, Baron Cheyne (434 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Cheyne (or Cheney), Baron Cheyne KG KB (ca. 1442 – 1499) was Master of the Horse to King Edward IV and personal bodyguard to King Henry VII of England
John Tuchet, 6th Baron Audley (440 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Tuchet, 6th Baron Audley, 3rd Baron Tuchet (1423 – 26 September 1490) was an English politician. John Tuchet was the son of James Tuchet, 5th Baron
Richard Woodville, 3rd Earl Rivers (361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Woodville, 3rd Earl Rivers (1453 – 6 March 1491) succeeded his brother, Anthony Woodville, as the third Earl Rivers. He was the son of Richard
Ralph Fitzherbert (761 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Ralph Fitzherbert (died 1483) was Lord of the manor of Norbury, Derbyshire. His effigy in his suit of armour at Norbury church are reproduced in the
Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey (2,137 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey (before 1445 – 4 April 1497) was an English heiress and lady-in-waiting to two queens. She became the first wife of
William Waynflete (3,430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Waynflete (c. 1398 – 11 August 1486), born William Patten, was Provost of Eton (1442–1447), Bishop of Winchester (1447–1486) and Lord Chancellor
Ralph Neville, 3rd Earl of Westmorland (793 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ralph Neville, 3rd Earl of Westmorland (c. 1456 – 6 February 1499) was an English peer. He was the grandfather of Ralph Neville, 4th Earl of Westmorland
John Welles, 1st Viscount Welles (948 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John (de) Welles, 1st Viscount Welles, KG (c. 1450 – 9 February 1498) was an English Lancastrian nobleman who was made a Knight of the Garter. John was
John Barnewall, 3rd Baron Trimlestown (686 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Barnewall, 3rd Baron Trimleston (1470-25 July 1538), was an Irish nobleman, judge and politician. He was the eldest son of Christopher Barnewall,
Octavian De Spinellis (113 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Octavian De SpinellisDCL (died June 1513) was Archbishop of Armagh from 1478 until 1513. During his time as Archbishop he had to adjudicate in a dispute
David Loades (550 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Loades studied at the University of Cambridge. He wrote many books on the Tudor period, including biographies. He was President of the Ecclesiastical History
Grace O'Malley (3,713 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Grace O'Malley (c. 1530 – c. 1603) - in her native Irish language Gráinne Ní Mháille, also known as Gráinne O'Malley, was the head of the Ó Máille dynasty
Grimsthorpe Castle (1,515 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Grimsthorpe Castle is a country house in Lincolnshire, England 4 miles (6.4 km) north-west of Bourne on the A151. It lies within a 3,000 acre (12 km²)
Edward Stafford, 2nd Earl of Wiltshire (728 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Stafford, 2nd Earl of Wiltshire (7 April 1470 – 24 March 1499) was an English nobleman. Edward Stafford, born 7 April 1470, was the only child of
Charles de Marillac (692 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles de Marillac (c.1510 – 2 December 1560) was a French prelate and diplomat. De Marillac was born in Riom, and was by the age of twenty-two an advocate
John Blanke (846 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Blanke (also rendered Blancke or Blak) (fl. 1501–1511) was a black musician in London in the early 16th century. He probably came to England as one
Mary, Queen of Scots (10,662 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary, Queen of Scots (8 December 1542 – 8 February 1587), also known as Mary Stuart or Mary I of Scotland, reigned over Scotland from 14 December 1542
Richard Amerike (2,361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard ap Meryk, anglicised to Richard Amerike (or Ameryk) (c. 1440–1503) was an Anglo-Welsh merchant, royal customs officer and, at the end of his life
Brian McPhelim O'Neill (795 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lower Clandeboye, a Gaelic lordship in north-eastern Ireland during the Tudor period. O'Neill was the son of Phelim Bacagh O'Neill. In 1556 he became lord
Gerald FitzGerald, 9th Earl of Kildare (1,992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gerard FitzGerald, 9th Earl of Kildare (1487 – 12 December 1534), also known in Irish as Gearóid Óg (Young Gerald), was a leading figure in 16th-century
James Ormond (administrator) (1,039 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir James Ormond alias Butler (died 17 July 1497) was the illegitimate son of John Butler, 6th Earl of Ormond. He was Lord Treasurer of Ireland from 1492
Christopher Fleming, 8th Baron Slane (313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher Fleming (bef. 1474–1517) was an Irish nobleman, who was Lord High Treasurer of Ireland from 1514 until his death. He succeeded as 8th Baron
Ghosts in English-speaking cultures (2,718 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
There is widespread belief in ghosts in English-speaking cultures, where ghosts are manifestations of the spirits of the dead. The beliefs may date back
Sir Roger Kynaston (846 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Roger Kynaston of Myddle and Hordley (ca. 1433 – 1495) was a Knight of the Realm and English nobleman. He was a member of the Kynaston family, of North
Lady Joan Fitzgerald (991 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joan Fitzgerald, Countess of Ormond, Countess of Desmond (Irish: Siobhán Nic Gearailt) (ca. 1509 or ca. 1514 – 2 January 1565) was an Irish noblewoman
Maurice FitzGerald, 9th Earl of Desmond (576 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maurice FitzGerald, 9th Earl of Desmond (died 1520) was the brother of James FitzGerald, 8th Earl of Desmond. Upon the murder of James FitzThomas FitzGerald
Henry Wentworth (1,043 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Henry Wentworth of Nettlestead, Suffolk, KB (born c. 1448 – died between 17 August 1499 and 27 February 1501), de jure 4th Baron le Despencer, was
Jean de Dinteville (74 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jean de Dinteville (1504–1555) was a French diplomat. He is the left-hand figure in Holbein's 1533 painting The Ambassadors, painted whilst he was French
James Butler of Polestown (481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir James Butler of Polestown (died 1487) was a warlord in Yorkist Ireland. James was the eldest son of Sir Edmund MacRichard Butler, whom he succeeded
Antoine de Noailles (293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antoine, 1st comte de Noailles (4 September 1504 – 11 March 1562) became admiral of France, and was ambassador in England during three important years
Michael East (composer) (416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Michael East (or Easte, Est, Este) (ca. 1580–1648) was an English organist and composer. He was a nephew of London music publisher Thomas East (ca. 1540–1608)
Abd el-Ouahed ben Messaoud (636 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abd el-Ouahed ben Messaoud ben Mohammed Anoun (Arabic: عبد الواحد بن مسعود بن محمد عنون‎ "Servant of The One, Son of Messaoud, Son of Mohammed Anoun")
Joan Thynne (561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joan, Lady Thynne, born Joan Hayward (1558 – 3 March 1612) was an English gentlewoman. She took an active role in managing property including Caus Castle
François van der Delft (193 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
François van der Delft (c. 1500 – 21 June 1550), was Imperial ambassador to the court of Henry VIII of England from 1545 to 1547 and ambassador to the
The Old Court House (2,364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Old Court House is a Grade II* listed house located off Hampton Court Green in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames; its origins date back to
Donnington Castle (825 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Chaucer before the castle was taken under royal control during the Tudor period. During the First English Civil War the castle was held by the royalist
John Catesby (265 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Catesby KS (died 1486) was a British judge. The Catesby family had been settled for some time in Northamptonshire and held the manor of Lapworth in
John Hothby (383 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Hothby (Otteby, Hocby, Octobi, Ottobi, c. 1410-1487), also known by his Latinised names Johannes Ottobi or Johannes de Londonis, was an English Renaissance
Claverley (350 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dominated the parish from the Middle Ages to the early 20th century. In the Tudor period they were closely associated with religiously conservative and recusant
Caius Choirbook (203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
choirbook dating to the early sixteenth century and containing music by Tudor-period composers. The book appears to originate from Arundel in Sussex, and
Gerald Aylmer (judge) (1,076 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Gerald Aylmer (ca. 1490–1560) was an Irish judge in the time of Henry VIII and played a key part in enforcing the Dissolution of the Monasteries. His
Brownsea Island (2,808 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brownsea Island, also archaically known as Branksea, is the largest of the islands in Poole Harbour in the county of Dorset, England. The island is owned
Bishop of Chester (1,200 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bishop of Chester is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Chester in the Province of York. The diocese expands across most of the historic
Hieronimo Custodis (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hieronimo Custodis (also spelled Hieronymus, Heironimos) (died c. 1593) was a Flemish portrait painter active in England in the reign of Elizabeth I. A
Thomas Bryan (Chief Justice) (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Thomas Bryan I KS KB (died 14 August 1500) was a British justice. He married Margaret Bowsey. He was born to the son of William John Bryan "Briennie"
Louis de Perreau, Sieur de Castillon (53 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Louis de Perreau, Sieur de Castillon was the French ambassador to England during the reign of Henry VIII. He served at the English court from November
Crosby Hall, London (3,311 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Crosby Hall is a historic building in London. The Great Hall was built in 1466 and originally stood in Bishopsgate, in the City of London, but was moved
Edmund Butler (bishop) (393 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Edmund Butler (died 1551) was appointed as the Catholic Archbishop of Cashel in 1527. He was the illegitimate son of Piers Butler, 8th Earl of Ormonde
Philibert de Chandée, 1st Earl of Bath (222 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philibert de Chandée, 1st Earl of Bath (died after 1486 in Brittany, France) was an Earl in the English peerage. He entertained Henry Tudor, then Earl
Simon Renard (1,588 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Simon Renard, Sieur of Bermont and Lieutenant of Aumont or Amont, (1513- 8 August 1573) was a Burgundian diplomat who served as an advisor to Emperor Charles
Sean mac Fergail Óicc Ó hUiginn (159 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sean mac Fergail Óicc Ó hUiccinn (died 1490) was an Irish poet. Ó hUiccinn was an Irish poet who held the post of Chief Ollam of Ireland. His father was
James FitzGerald, 13th Earl of Desmond (1,615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James (Séamus) FitzJohn FitzGerald (died 27 October 1558) was an Irish nobleman, the second son of John FitzGerald, de facto 12th Earl of Desmond, and
Humphrey Starkey (189 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Humphrey Starkey SL (died 1486) was a British justice. He studied at Inner Temple and was made Recorder of London in 1471. In 1478 he was made a Serjeant-at-Law
Thomas Fleming, 10th Baron Slane (261 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Fleming (died 1601) was an Irish peer, and a member of the Parliament of Ireland of 1585. He was the son of James Fleming, and greatgrandson of
John FitzGerald, de facto 12th Earl of Desmond (218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John FitzGerald, de facto 12th Earl of Desmond (died December 1536) was the brother of Thomas FitzGerald, 11th Earl of Desmond. Upon his brother's death
Thomas FitzGerald, 11th Earl of Desmond (452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas FitzGerald, 11th Earl of Desmond (1454 - 1534) was the uncle of James FitzGerald, 10th Earl of Desmond. Alfred Webb tells us of this earl that:
Nicholas Bourbon (the elder) (550 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Nicholas Bourbon ([niʃolɑ buʁbɔ̃]; 1503 or 1505 - after 1550) was a French court preceptor and poet. He wrote a collection of poems called Nugae (Latin
Constitutional status of Cornwall (7,839 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tongue, ... in manners, or ells in lawes and ordinaunces. During the Tudor period some travellers regarded the Cornish as a separate cultural group, from
Henry Lovel, 8th Baron Morley (110 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Lovel (or Lovell), 8th Baron Morley (died 1489) was an English peer and translator, Lord of Morley, Hingham, Hockering, &c., in Norfolk. He was the
Jacques d'Albon, Seigneur de Saint André (199 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jacques d'Albon, Seigneur de Saint-André (c. 1505-1562) was a French soldier and favorite of Henry II of France. He was made marshal of France, governor
William Norreys (981 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir William Norreys (c.1441 – before 10 January 1507) was a famous Lancastrian soldier, and later an Esquire of the Body to King Edward IV. Probably born
Ieuan Dyfi (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ieuan Dyfi (c. 1461? – after 1502?) was a Welsh language poet. Very little information has survived relating to Ieuan and his poetry. Ieuan composed five
Jeanne de Gontaut (349 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jeanne de Gontaut, Countess of Noailles (c. 1520  – 26 September 1586), was a French noblewoman and the wife of Antoine de Noailles, Admiral of France
George Elliott (spy) (136 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Eliot was an English spy in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Eliot is reported to have been an unsavoury character. He earned his living as a confidence
John Savage (soldier) (560 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir John Savage, KG (1444–1492), of Cheshire landed gentry, was a noted English military commander of the late 15th-century, who fought at the Battle of
William Weston (explorer) (1,921 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Weston, a 15th-century merchant from Bristol, was probably the first Englishman to lead an expedition to North America, the voyage taking place
Hugh Clopton (932 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hugh Clopton (c. 1440 – 15 September 1496) was a Lord Mayor of London, a member of the Worshipful Company of Mercers and a benefactor of his home town
Bishop of Bristol (1,132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity portal The Bishop of Bristol heads the Church of England Diocese of Bristol in the Province of Canterbury, in England. The present diocese
Thomas Radclyffe, 3rd Earl of Sussex (1,857 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sussex KG (c. 1525 – 9 June 1583), was Lord Deputy of Ireland during the Tudor period of English history, and a leading courtier during the reign of Elizabeth
Odet de Selve (150 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Odet de Selve (c. 1504-1563) was a French diplomat. He was the son of Jean de Selve, first president at the parliaments of Rouen and Bordeaux, vice-chancellor
Coventry Castle (475 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coventry Castle (grid reference SP336788) was a motte and bailey castle in the city of Coventry, England. It was demolished in the late 12th century and
James FitzGerald, 10th Earl of Desmond (500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James FitzGerald, 10th Earl of Desmond (d. 1529) was the son of Maurice FitzGerald, 9th Earl of Desmond. He plotted against King Henry VIII with King Francis
Margaret Butler, Countess of Ormond (1,509 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Butler (née FitzGerald), Countess of Ormond, Countess of Ossory (c. 1473 – 9 August 1542) was an Irish noblewoman and a member of the powerful
William Brandon (died 1491) (1,274 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir William Brandon (died 1491), of Wangford in Suffolk, was an English landowner, administrator, soldier, courtier and politician. His grandson was Charles
Gilbert Banester (297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gilbert Banester (also Banaster, Banastir, Banastre; c. 1445 – 1487) was an English composer and poet of Flemish influences. Possibly a native of London
Roger Machado (officer of arms) (672 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Roger Machado (Portuguese: Rogério Machado; died 6 May 1510) was an English diplomat and officer of arms of Portuguese extraction. He lived among the Portuguese
Jean Hotman, Marquis de Villers-St-Paul (928 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jean Hotman, Marquis de Villers-St-Paul (1552 – 26 January 1636) was a French diplomat. Although he came from a Calvinist family, who had been exiled during
Christopher Willoughby, 10th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (1,384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Christopher Willoughby, de jure 10th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (1453 – between 1 November 1498 and 13 July 1499), was heir to his second cousin, Joan
William Calow (60 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Calow (died 1487) was an English justice. He was educated at Middle Temple and was made a Serjeant-at-Law in 1479. On 31 January 1487 he became
Oliver Lawrence (75 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Oliver Lawrence (by 1507 – 1559), of Poole and Creech St Michael, Dorset, London and Soberton, Hampshire, was an English Member of Parliament. He was a
Elizabeth Norton (482 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is a British historian specialising in the queens of England and the Tudor period. She obtained a Master of Arts in archaeology and anthropology from the
Bishop of Carlisle (1,266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bishop of Carlisle is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Carlisle in the Province of York. The diocese covers the county of Cumbria except
Gómez Suárez de Figueroa y Córdoba, 1st Duke of Feria (327 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gómez Suárez de Figueroa y Córdoba, 1st Duke of Feria (1520?–1571) was a Spanish nobleman and diplomat, and close advisor of Philip II's. Probably born
William Celling (417 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Celling (or William Tilly of Selling) (died 1494) was an English Benedictine prior (or abbot), diplomat, and humanist scholar. He derived his name
John Bourchier, 6th Baron Ferrers of Groby (194 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir John Bourchier (c. 1438 – 1495) was a 15th-century English knight and nobleman. He was steward of the Honour of Richmond. Bourchier fought in the Battle
Sir George Seymour (36 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir George Seymour was an English knight. Born in Chelmsford on the 11th of June. He was a younger son of John Seymour and Elizabeth Coker or Croker. He
Wem (4,313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wem is a small market town in Shropshire, England, 9 miles (14 km) north of Shrewsbury on the rail line between that town and Crewe in Cheshire. The name
Polychrome brickwork (1,189 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Historically it was used in the late Gothic period in Europe, and the Tudor period in England, and was revived in Britain in the 1850s as a feature of Gothic
Thomas Burton (merchant) (171 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Burton (died 1495 or 1496) was an English wool merchant who worked for the Company of the Staple at Calais. He left money in his will that was used
Jean Scheyfve (1,825 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jean or Jehan Scheyfve, (c.1515-13 July 1581), Lord of Sint-Agatha-Rode, was Chancellor of Brabant, head of the civilian administration of the Duchy of
Paul de Foix (314 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul de Foix de Carmain (1528–1584) was a French prelate and diplomat. He was son of Jean de Foix, comte de Carmain, by his wife Aldonce. He studied Greek
Lambeth Choirbook (657 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
music for 7 Masses, 4 Magnificats, and 8 motets. Much of the music is by Tudor-period composers. The major contributors are Robert Fayrfax and Nicholas Ludford;
Richard Lawley (53 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Lawley (by 1515 – 1569), of Spoonhill and Much Wenlock, Shropshire, was an English Member of Parliament. He was a Member (MP) of the Parliament
William Martyn (Lord Mayor) (40 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir William Martyn was Sheriff of London in 1484 and Lord Mayor of London in 1492, representing the Skinners. He was made KB. William Martyn may have been
William Gage (15th-century landowner) (803 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Gage (about 1447 – 16 February 1496/7) was a major landowner and the father of the Tudor courtier Sir John Gage KG. William Gage was the elder
Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder (3,530 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder, Marc Gerard and Marcus Garret (c. 1520 – c. 1590) was a Flemish painter, draughtsman, print designer and etcher who was active
Erdington (4,631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Erdington is a suburb and ward of Birmingham that is historically part of Warwickshire. It is 5 miles (8 km) northeast of central Birmingham, England and
Christopher Holywood (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher Holywood (1559 – 4 September 1626) was an Irish Jesuit of the Counter Reformation. The origin of the Nag's Head Fable has been traced to him
Andrea Badoer (39 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Andrea Biagio Badoer or Andrea Badoer (fl. 1509) was the Venetian ambassador to the Court of Henry VIII of England. His dispatches are today read in the
William of Wallingford (1,941 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William of Wallingford (died 20 June 1492) was the 47th abbot of St Albans Abbey. He was a Benedictine monk at Holy Trinity Priory, Wallingford, Berkshire
Genealogical Office (1,916 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1943 as successor to the Ulster King of Arms, established during the Tudor period of the Kingdom of Ireland in 1552. The Ulster King of Arms' duties were
Arthur Lynch (mayor) (155 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Arthur Lynch (Mayor), 22nd Mayor of Galway, died 20 November 1507. Lynch was a member of one of The Tribes of Galway, and was notable as the first of the
Dafydd Llwyd ap Llywelyn ap Gruffudd (Dafydd Llwyd o Fathafarn) (190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Dafydd Llwyd ap Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, usually referred to as Dafydd Llwyd o Fathafarn (fl. c.1400–c.1490) was a Welsh language poet, a native of Mathafarn
Lewis Machin (197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lewis Machin (fl. 1607–09) was an English poet and playwright in the early 17th century. He may have worked with Gervase Markham on the play The Dumb Knight
Thomas Arundell (1454–1485) (404 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Thomas Arundell (1454–1485) was an English nobleman. He was made a Knight of the Bath at the Coronation of Richard III in 1483. Two years later, when
Long Meg of Westminster (154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Barnes, known in history under her sobriquet Long Meg of Westminster (fl. 1553), was an English innkeeper. She is an historic person, but the
Joan Boughton (117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joan Boughton (c. 1410s – 28 April 1494) was an English martyr. Boughton was an old widow of eighty years or more who held views associated with John Wycliffe
Andrea Badoer (39 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Andrea Biagio Badoer or Andrea Badoer (fl. 1509) was the Venetian ambassador to the Court of Henry VIII of England. His dispatches are today read in the
Long Meg of Westminster (154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Barnes, known in history under her sobriquet Long Meg of Westminster (fl. 1553), was an English innkeeper. She is an historic person, but the
Owain Glyndŵr (5,288 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Owain ap Gruffydd, lord of Glyndyfrdwy (c. 1359 – c. 1415), or simply Owain Glyndŵr or Glyn Dŵr (pronounced [ˈoʊain ɡlɨ̞nˈduːr], anglicised to Owen Glendower)
Robert Chester (poet) (2,029 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Chester (flourished 1601) is the mysterious author of the poem Love's Martyr which was published in 1601 as the main poem in a collection which
Boleyn (160 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the surname of a noble English family particularly prominent in the Tudor period, members of which include: Anne Boleyn, Queen consort of England (1533
Henry Dudley (conspirator) (864 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(1517–1568) was an English Admiral, soldier, diplomat, and conspirator of the Tudor period. Born in Dudley Castle, Staffordshire, Henry Dudley was the second son
Jean du Bellay (3,710 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jean du Bellay (1492 – 16 February 1560) was a French diplomat and cardinal, a younger brother of Guillaume du Bellay, and cousin and patron of the poet
Great Hallingbury (295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Stortford, and the M11 motorway. Great Hallingbury contains houses from the Tudor period to modern. Decrease in population has resulted in the closure of the
John Felix (97 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Felix (fl. 1498) was an English Benedictine monk, belonging to St Peter's Monastery, Westminster. Felix lived about the middle of the reign of Henry
Guy Fairfax (367 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Guy Fairfax (died 1495), was an English judge. Fairfax was of a Yorkshire family, and third son of Richard Fairfax of Walton, by his wife, Anastasia
Peter Pears (3,684 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sang an extensive repertoire of music from four centuries, from the Tudor period to the most modern times. With Britten, Pears was a co-founder of the
John Redford (500 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
November 1547) was a major English composer, organist, and dramatist of the Tudor period. From about 1525 he was organist at St Paul's Cathedral (succeeding Thomas
Beer in Sussex (2,402 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Beer in Sussex is beer produced in the historic county of Sussex in England, a region divided for administrative purposes into East Sussex and West Sussex
Patrick Finglas (749 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Patrick Finglas (died 1537) was a leading Irish judge and statesman of the sixteenth century, who was regarded (except perhaps in his last years)as a mainstay
Gilbert Debenham (1,047 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Gilbert Debenham (junior) (1432–1500) was an English knight, politician and soldier who served briefly as Lord Chancellor of Ireland. Although, like
Ricard Bourke (56 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ricard Bourke was the 9th Mac William Iochtar and lord of Lower (North) Connacht, who died in 1509. The History of Mayo, Hubert T. Knox, 1908 Lower Mac
Richard Neele (104 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Neele, Knt., King's Serjeant KS (died 1486) was a British judge. He was educated at Gray's Inn, and was made a Serjeant-at-Law in 1463. A year
William Calthorpe (758 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir William Calthorpe KB (30 January 1410 – 15 November 1494) was an English knight and Lord of the Manors of Burnham Thorpe and Ludham in Norfolk. He
Magnate (552 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the manors and the associated knights' fees.[citation needed] In the Tudor period, after Henry VII defeated Richard III at Bosworth Field, Henry made a
Michel de Sèvre (228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Michel de Sèvre or de Seurre (active 1539–1593), Knight of St John, was a French courtier and diplomat, Grand Master of the Order of Saint Lazarus 1564–1578
Finn Ó Haughluinn (236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Finn Ó Haughluinn, Irish musician, died 1490. Ó Haughluinn is described in his obituary in the Annals of the Four Masters as Chief Tympanist of Ireland
Edmund Sturton (96 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Stourton, fl. late 15th-early 16th century) was an English composer of the Tudor period. Little is known about his life and career, but he is believed to be
Helen Castor (761 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
August 1968 in Cambridge) is a British historian of the medieval and Tudor period and a BBC broadcaster. She taught history at Cambridge University and
Thomas Brugge, 5th Baron Chandos (653 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Brugge, de jure 5th Baron Chandos (1427 – 30 January 1493), was an English peer. Thomas Brugge was born in Coberley, Gloucestershire, England son
Marney (165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ancestry Henry Marney, 1st Baron Marney (1447–1523), politician of the Tudor period in England Jo Marney, British model Laura Marney, Scottish novelist and
Thomas Smyth (160 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1522–1591), collector of customs duties ("customer") in London during the Tudor period, father of the above Tommy Smyth (born 1946), Irish-American soccer commentator
Twelve-pound cannon (571 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
shrapnel, and later shells and canister shot. It was first used during the Tudor period and was commonly used during the Napoleonic Wars, 1799–1815. At this
Owen Caech Ó Dubhda (82 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Owen Caech Ó Dubhda (died 1495) was Chief of the Name and Lord of Tireragh. Owen Caech was the son of a Ruaidhrí Ó Dubhda, though probably not the man
Stephen Hawes (921 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Stephen Hawes (died 1523) was a popular English poet during the Tudor period who is now little known.[citation needed] He was probably born in Suffolk
Whitefriars, Coventry (1,935 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The buildings known as Whitefriars are the surviving fragments of a Carmelite friary founded in 1342 in Coventry, England. All that remains are the eastern
Thomas Barowe (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Barowe or Barrow (died 1497?) was an English ecclesiastic and judge. Barowe was rector of Olney, Buckinghamshire, and was appointed to a prebend
Thomas Fich (218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Fich, Fych or Fyche (died 1517), was an Irish ecclesiastic and compiler. He studied at Oxford, became a canon regular, and was appointed sub-prior
White House (Casa Grande, Arizona) (109 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Places in 1985. It was noted to be the best example in Casa Grande of a Tudor Period Revival House. It was the home of J.W. White, a long-time resident who
John Houling (212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Houling (1539?-1599), was an Irish Jesuit. Houling was born in Wexford about 1539, and entered the Society of Jesus in 1571, being professed of the
Thornham Magna (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
depicted in profile. Thornham Hall, at Thornham Magna, was built in the Tudor period on an E-shaped plan and remodelled in the 17th century and again in the
Sir John Lyttelton (1520–1590) (543 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
politician, knight, and landowner from the Lyttelton family during the Tudor period. John Lyttelton was the son of Sir John Littleton (c. 1500–1533), son
Andrew Lynch (mayor) (232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Andrew Lynch (Mayor), 14th Mayor of Galway, died 25 March 1523. Lynch was a member of The Tribes of Galway, and served the term 1498-1499. He is notable
Anthony St Leger (Lord Deputy of Ireland) (1,756 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Kent, was an English politician and Lord Deputy of Ireland during the Tudor period. Anthony St Leger was the eldest son of Ralph II St Leger of Ulcombe
Swift Ditch (300 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the backwater was known as Purden's Stream. However by the end of the Tudor period it was known as Swift Ditch, remaining the faster route. The Oxford-Burcot
Portcullis (982 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
motif of English heraldry, especially that heraldry dating from the Tudor period. The heraldic office of Portcullis Pursuivant of Arms in Ordinary, a
Gilles de la Pommeraie (164 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gilles de la Pommeraie was a 16th-century French diplomat and Baron d'Entrammes. He was a member of the La Pommeraie family, from Brittany and serves Laval
William Biddlecombe (68 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Biddlecombe (by 1488–1546/47), of Poole, Dorset was an English merchant, mayor and Member of Parliament. He was a Member (MP) of the Parliament
Thomas Lawley (MP died 1559) (46 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Lawley (died 1559), of Much Wenlock, Shropshire, was an English Member of Parliament and merchant. He was a Member (MP) of the Parliament of England
Feet of fines (2,739 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the Tudor Period. Part I: [1486–1570]. Yorkshire Archaeological Society Record Series. 2. Collins, F., ed. (1888). Feet of Fines for the Tudor Period. Part
Sebastian Giustinian (38 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sebastian Giustinian was a sixteenth-century Venetian diplomat. Between 1515 and 1519, during the reign of Henry VIII of England, Giustinian was the Venetian
Cole Park (444 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was owned in the Middle Ages by the Abbey of Malmesbury, and in the Tudor period was a royal stud. The house is in the grounds of a former medieval monastic
Muriel St. Clare Byrne (567 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
- 1983), was a prominent historical researcher, specializing in the Tudor period and the reign of Henry VIII of England. Born Hoylake, Cheshire, England
Pedro de Ayala (5,870 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Don Pedro de Ayala also Pedro López Ayala (died 31 January 1513) was a 16th-century Spanish diplomat employed by Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I
Old Grammar School, Coventry (578 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Old Grammar School, Coventry is a Grade I listed building in Coventry, England on the corner of Bishop Street and Hales Street. The Hospital of St
Spanish Chronicle (232 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
century that related an eyewitness' account of various events in the Tudor period. Alison Weir, in The Six Wives of Henry VIII, notes that the Spanish
St David's College, Llandudno (266 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
such as Gloddaeth Hall, centred on the Minstrel Hall dating from the Tudor period, right up to Chelsea/Augusta Houses and the Keith Lennard Technology
Baron Lisle (1,344 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
created five times in the Peerage of England during the Middle Ages and Tudor period. The earliest creation was in 1299 for John de L'Isle of Wootton on the
Axbridge (1,742 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
manor of Cheddar to the Bishop of Bath and Wells. Axbridge grew in the Tudor period as a centre for cloth manufacture, This was reflected in its early royal
Sammelband (581 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sammelband (/ˈzæməlbænt/ ZAM-əl-bant, plural Sammelbände /ˌzæməlˈbɛndə/ ZAM-əl-BEN-də or Sammelbands), or sometimes nonce-volume, is a book comprising
Stigma of print (430 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
almost no aristocratic publication of creative literature in the early Tudor period, the publication of poetry is fairly common in the reign of Elizabeth
John Bourchier (bishop-designate) (19 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Bourchier (1493-in/around 1577) was bishop-designate of Gloucester, England. http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/47174
Karl Harst (50 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Karl Harst (fl. 1540) was a sixteenth-century diplomat from the German Duchy of Cleves. He was the Duke of Cleves' representative in London during the
Cahir mac Art Kavanagh (543 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Molyns, and baron of Ballyann (died 1554), was an Irish magnate of the Tudor period. Cahir was the eldest son of Art Kavanagh of St. Molyns (Teach Molyns)
Alison Plowden (484 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
historian and biographer well known for her popular non-fiction about the Tudor period. She was born at Quetta in India, a descendant of Edmund Plowden and
Karl Harst (50 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Karl Harst (fl. 1540) was a sixteenth-century diplomat from the German Duchy of Cleves. He was the Duke of Cleves' representative in London during the
Mansfield (9,151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mansfield is a large market town and the administrative centre of the Mansfield District in Nottinghamshire, England. Including being the biggest town
Casper Van Senden (275 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Casper Van Senden was an Elizabethan Lübeck merchant who bargained for a deal in 1596 whereby through ensuring the safe return of eighty-nine of Queen
Alexander Dyce (572 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
survives) of this unjustly overlooked and often maligned poet of the early Tudor period. It is still indispensable for a serious study of the poet. In 1857 his
Eglantine Table (327 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
for accuracy. In addition there are depicted playing cards from the Tudor Period and other means of amusement such as backgammon, and floral decoration
William Martin (Athelhampton) (173 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir William Martin of Athelhampton, near Dorchester, Dorset (c. 1446 – 24 March 1503/4) was MP for Dorset in 1478. He built the current Great Hall of Athelhampton
Earl of Devon (4,491 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
very close to the line of succession to the English throne. During the Tudor period all but the last Earl were attainted, and there were several recreations
Penzance (10,391 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Penzance (/pɛnˈzæns/ pen-ZANSS; Cornish: Pennsans) is a town, civil parish and port in the Penwith district of Cornwall, United Kingdom. It is the most
Windsor Castle (13,159 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
entire Middle Ages in England". Edward's core design lasted through the Tudor period, during which Henry VIII and Elizabeth I made increasing use of the castle
Fane family (523 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Fane (d 1589) made one of the most advantageous marriages of the Tudor period when he made his second wife Mary, daughter of Henry Nevill, 6th Baron
Shelton Hall (Norfolk) (521 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
for his services to Edward III at the Battle of Crecy (1346). In the Tudor period Sir John Shelton, the twenty-first Lord of the Manor, and his wife Anne
Henry Jerningham (1,256 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jerningham KB (1509/10 – 6 September 1572) was an English courtier during the Tudor period. He was a Gentleman Pensioner during the reign of Henry VIII. In the
Simon Fernandes (1,490 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Simon Fernandes (Portuguese: Simão Fernandes; c. 1538 – c. 1590) was a 16th-century Portuguese-born navigator and sometime pirate who piloted the 1585
Axmouth (591 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fifteenth-century tower and a carved Norman doorway and pillars. The Tudor period Bindon House is nearby and the remains of a hillfort can be seen on Hawkesdown
Cavalier boots (435 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
first worn with buff coats by gentlemen and soldiers during the mid-Tudor period. By the reign of Elizabeth I these had low heels to facilitate riding
Wakefield Museum (278 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
covers the story of Wakefield, looking at the Manor of Wakefield in the Tudor period, HM Prison Wakefield, Wakefield as the West Yorkshire Police Headquarters
Artists of the Tudor court (3,545 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
elaborate decorative schemes for masques, tournaments, and other events. The Tudor period was one of unusual isolation from European trends for England. At the
William Horman (2,112 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
April 1535) was a headmaster at Eton and Winchester College in the early Tudor period of English history. He is best known for his Latin grammar textbook the
The Tower of London (novel) (1,787 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Scavenger's Daughter are based on Jardine's description of torture in the Tudor period. By recounting suffering and torture in The Tower of London, Ainsworth
Lewys Daron (301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
portrait of the gentry society of north-west Wales at the start of the Tudor period. On the basis of his name and a reference to him in a later 16th-century
Foxy's Hole (101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
children that is played as a game. It is thought to originate from the Tudor period. The lyrics are as follows: Put your finger in Foxy's hole Foxy's not
Margery (disambiguation) (517 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Margery is a female given name derived from Margaret, which can also be spelled as Marjorie or Marjory. From the Old French, the Middle English forms of
Foxy's Hole (101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
children that is played as a game. It is thought to originate from the Tudor period. The lyrics are as follows: Put your finger in Foxy's hole Foxy's not
Greyfriars, Worcester (1,455 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
considerable portion of the old friary still exists. .. it is of the early Tudor period ...’. Without giving any reasons he implies that No 9 was the guest house
Oldland (399 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
churchyard contained a large yew tree which had been growing since the Tudor period. It remained standing until 2020 when it was blown down by a storm in
Knole (7,163 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Knole (/noʊl/)NT is a country house and former archbishop's palace situated within Knole Park, a 1,000-acre (400-hectare) park located immediately to the
Bill (weapon) (722 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
stick with the combination of bill and English longbow. Even in the Tudor period, bills were still common with levies sent to fight the Scots. The Battle
James Carley (204 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history and provenance of medieval English manuscripts and the early Tudor period. He has written about the history of Glastonbury Abbey, Tudor antiquary
Nicholas Ludford (1,692 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nicholas Ludford (c. 1485 – 1557) was an English composer of the Tudor period. He is known for his festal masses, which are preserved in two early-16th-century
Philip Flattisbury (476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philip Flattisbury (fl. 1500), was an Irish compiler. Flattisbury was from a prominent Irish family: members of the family, from the thirteenth century
Upsall Castle (665 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Francis, ed. (1888). 'Yorkshire Fines: 1579', in Feet of Fines of the Tudor Period [Yorks]: Part 2, 1571-83. Leeds. pp. 124–146. Grainge, William; Baker
Holborn (3,450 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
level) according to whether the part was in the City or outside. From the Tudor period onwards new local government were introduced in England, and parish areas
Claire Ridgway (1,038 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
TheAnneBoleynFiles.com, and it rapidly grew into a major website for the study of the Tudor period. This website has peaked at over 900 site visitors at the same time in
Ye olde (239 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was written þe, employing the Old English letter thorn, þ. During the Tudor period, the scribal abbreviation for þe was ("þͤ" or "þᵉ" with modern symbols);
Henry Barley (1,301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1529), of Albury, Hertfordshire, was a Member of Parliament during the Tudor period. Henry Barley, born about 1487, was the son of William Barley (1451–1521)
Sheila Bishop (927 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
books published. Her early work alternated between plots set in the Tudor period and the contemporary 1960s, some with flashbacks to the 1930s and 1940s
Thomas Bromley (5,598 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
16th-century lawyer, judge and politician who established himself in the mid-Tudor period and rose to prominence during the reign of Elizabeth I. He was successively
Wallsworth Hall (1,033 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Houses'. The hall was built on the site of a timbered house from the Tudor period soon after 1740 by Samuel Hayward, as a wedding present for his wife
St Peter and St Paul and St Elizabeth Catholic Church, Coughton (696 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
profession of the Catholic faith officially for the first time since the Tudor period. The church currently holds Grade II listed status. The Throckmorton
Ray F. and Ethel Smith House (115 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Register of Historic Places in 2019. It is a one-and-a-half-story "English Tudor period revival cottage" built in 1937. It is a stucco-covered wood frame building
Nennius of Britain (536 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
leads to Caesar's withdrawal and inspires rebellion in France. In the Tudor period Nennius became a patriotic symbol of British independence. In The Mirror
Dudley (surname) (810 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Edmund Dudley (c. 1462 or 1471/1472–1510), English politician in the Tudor period Edward Bishop Dudley (1789–1855), American politician, 28th governor
Cattle raiding (1,323 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the The Cattle Raid of Cooley. Cattle raiding continued well into the Tudor period in Ireland, particularly against English settlements both inside and
Lanzalonga (373 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
scholarly mostly as lanzalonga, the term was also, normally, translated in Tudor period english as Long Spear. It was a medieval pole weapon typical of Italian
1556 (934 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Italian poet and statesman (b. 1495) John Gage, English courtier of the Tudor period (b. 1479) April 26 – Valentin Friedland, German scholar and educationist
Ashdown Forest (12,622 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
on two occasions, during the Roman occupation of Britain and in the Tudor period when, in 1496, England's first blast furnace was built at Newbridge,
St Andrew's Church, Cherry Hinton (276 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
English Gothic architecture. The east window was replaced in the early Tudor period by a five-light version in the perpendicular style. The ashlar-faced
Bog-wood (1,198 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the world it is still used to craft unique artifacts. Prized in the Tudor period for its dark hue, bog oak was used to construct the throne of Peter the
Hackbridge (1,116 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Deer Park attached to Carew Manor, a grand country house built in the Tudor period, which stands to this day. It is a large area of open grassland with
Little London, Tadley, Hampshire (699 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Engelfield family and given to the Benyon family during the late Tudor period. Other parts were gifted in payment to The Queen's College, Oxford. It
Cefnllys (1,191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Archaeological finds surrounding the church have been mostly from the Tudor period or later, however. The church's structure is of 13th century origin,
1479 (654 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
astronomer (d. 1541) October 28 – John Gage, English courtier of the Tudor period (d. 1556) November 6 Joanna of Castile, Queen of Philip I of Castile
William Herbert (277 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1451–1491) William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (died 1570) (c. 1501–1570), Tudor period noble and courtier William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1580–1630)
Dafydd Gam (1,937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Duke of Alençon himself. This story was being frequently told by the Tudor period in histories of the campaign and by the descendants of those involved
1526 (981 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
26 – Rose Lok, English businesswoman and Protestant exile during the Tudor period (d. 1613) December 28 – Anna Maria of Brandenburg-Ansbach, German princess
The Pale (1,547 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
indicated that Ireland was withdrawing from English cultural norms. By the Tudor period, the Irish culture and language had regained most of the territory initially
Stokeinteignhead (639 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
name, and this (the only important or ancient building) dates to the Tudor period in the early 16th century. "Map of Devon Parishes" (PDF). Devon County
Regicide (2,117 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Macbeth (Macbeth's killing of King Duncan) and The Lion King. Before the Tudor period, English kings had been murdered while imprisoned (for example Edward
History of St Neots (3,445 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
St Neots is the largest town in Cambridgeshire, England. The town originally developed next to a medieval priory in the form of market stalls. These were
Mortimer Common (1,024 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were ignored and the throne was vested in Henry IV instead. During the Tudor period Mortimer was one of the lands granted to each of the wives of Henry VIII
Gong farmer (971 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
television series The Worst Jobs in History to be one of the worst of the Tudor period. Those employed at Hampton Court during the time of Queen Elizabeth I
St James's Palace Stakes (524 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
event is named after St. James's Palace, a royal residence during the Tudor period. It was established in 1834, and the inaugural race was a walkover. The
Coat of arms of Ireland (3,494 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
earlier featured of the coins of the Lordship of Ireland during the Tudor period and continued to be used on the coins of the Kingdom of Ireland. Following
Mac Carthaigh Riabhach (1,409 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
West and Muskerry East, baronies in central Cork that were part of the Tudor period principality of Carbery. Francis MacCarthy Willis Bund – a descendant
List of museums in the West Midlands (260 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Museums & Art Gallery Selly Manor Bournville Birmingham Historic Two Tudor period timber-framed houses Soho House Handsworth Birmingham Historic house
Mother Goose (2,104 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
lore—"Mother Carey's chicken" being the European storm-petrel—and the Tudor period prophetess "Mother Shipton". Shahed, Syed Mohammad (1995). "A Common
Dudley Castle (2,604 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
During the Tudor period, John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland ordered the construction of a range of new buildings within the ancient castle.
Catholic Church in England and Wales (16,271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Catholic Church in England and Wales (Latin: Ecclesia Catholica in Anglia et Cambria) (Welsh: Yr Eglwys Gatholig yng Nghymru a Lloegr) is part of the
Earl of Pembroke's Armour (506 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Herbert (1501-1570). William Herbert was a noble and courtier during the Tudor Period and served as a guardian to King Edward VI following the death of King
Lauren Mackay (858 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lauren Mackay is an historian, author, and lecturer specializing in the Tudor period and the broader Early Modern world, and whose focus of study goes beyond
Early music of the British Isles (5,161 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
incorporated into court masques. Consorts of instruments developed in the Tudor period in England as either 'whole' consorts, that is, all instruments of the
English nationalism (5,022 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that help to form nations had become discernible'. The historian of the Tudor period, Geoffrey Elton, has asserted that the "Tudor revolution in government"
Hampton Court Palace (5,140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Boleyn's apartments above the gate when Boleyn was beheaded. During the Tudor period, the palace was the scene of many historic events. In 1537, the King's
Cabinet Office (1,027 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is built over the site of the Cockpit, used for cock fighting in the Tudor period, and subsequently as a theatre. In the early 1960s the buildings were
Frieze (horse) (722 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
was a moderate racehorse who produced several other winners including Tudor Period (White Rose Stakes). She was distantly descended from the 1854 Oaks winner
Old Beaupre Castle (886 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
it is a fine example of a medieval manor house, modified during the Tudor period, and its carved Renaissance porch is particularly impressive. Old Beaupre
Port Isaac (1,567 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Port Isaac was a thriving port serving the area inland. During the Tudor period the harbour was dredged, a good illustration of its importance. Once
Royal yacht (1,623 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Crown's debts. The next royal vessels in England were built in the Tudor period with Henry VIII using a vessel in 1520 that was depicted as having cloth