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searching for United States Office of War Information 111 found (271 total)

alternate case: united States Office of War Information

Natasha Borovsky (360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Natasha Borovsky (Russian: Наталья Александровна Боровская)(August 5, 1924 – May 31, 2012) was a Russian American poet and novelist. She is the author
Robert Riskin (1,528 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Riskin (March 30, 1897 – September 20, 1955) was an American Academy Award-winning screenwriter and playwright, best known for his collaborations
Harry Stack Sullivan (1,351 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Herbert "Harry" Stack Sullivan (February 21, 1892, Norwich, New York – January 14, 1949, Paris, France) was an American Neo-Freudian psychiatrist and psychoanalyst
Tambi Larsen (291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tambi Larsen (11 September 1914 – 24 March 2001) was a Dane born in Bangalore, India. He emigrated to the United States at the age of 20, where he attended
Barbara W. Tuchman (1,807 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barbara Wertheim Tuchman (/ˈtʌkmən/; January 30, 1912 – February 6, 1989) was an American historian and author. She won the Pulitzer Prize twice, for The
Charles Olson (2,149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Olson (27 December 1910 – 10 January 1970) was a second generation modern American poet who was a link between earlier figures such as Ezra Pound
Bess Lomax Hawes (1,214 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bess Lomax Hawes (January 21, 1921 – November 27, 2009) was an American folk musician, folklorist, and researcher. She was the daughter of John Avery Lomax
Yul Brynner (4,220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yuliy Borisovich Briner (Russian: Юлий Борисович Бринер; July 11, 1920 – October 10, 1985), known professionally as Yul Brynner, was a Russian, French
Alan Cranston (2,209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alan MacGregor Cranston (June 19, 1914 – December 31, 2000) was an American politician and journalist who served as a United States Senator from California
Ralph J. Gleason (1,151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ralph Joseph Gleason (March 1, 1917 – June 3, 1975) was an American music critic and columnist. He contributed for many years to the San Francisco Chronicle
Pat Frank (589 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harry Hart "Pat" Frank (May 5, 1908 – October 12, 1964) was an American writer, newspaperman, and government consultant. Frank's best known work is the
Milton S. Eisenhower (1,476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Milton Stover Eisenhower (September 15, 1899 – May 2, 1985) was an American academic administrator. He served as president of three major American universities:
Leith Stevens (1,219 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leith Stevens (September 13, 1909 – July 23, 1970) was an American music composer and conductor of radio and film scores. Leith Stevens was born in Mount
Edwin Palmer Hoyt (926 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edwin Palmer Hoyt (August 5, 1923 – July 29, 2005) was an American writer who specialized in military history. Until 1958, Hoyt worked in news media, after
James Reston (1,909 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Barrett Reston (November 3, 1909 – December 6, 1995), nicknamed "Scotty", was an American journalist whose career spanned the mid-1930s to the early
Ted Berry (698 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Moody Berry (November 8, 1905 – October 15, 2000), an American politician of the Charter Party of Cincinnati, Ohio, was the first African-American
Gail Kubik (392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gail Thompson Kubik (September 5, 1914, South Coffeyville, Oklahoma – July 20, 1984, Covina, California) was an American composer, music director, violinist
Leo Rosten (1,939 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leo Calvin Rosten (Yiddish: ליאָ קאַלװין ראָסטען‎; April 11, 1908 – February 19, 1997) was an American humorist in the fields of scriptwriting, storywriting
William S. Paley (3,198 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Samuel Paley (September 28, 1901 – October 26, 1990) was an American businessman, primarily involved in the media, and best known as the chief
Wilbur Schramm (1,588 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wilbur Lang Schramm (August 5, 1907 – December 27, 1987), was a scholar and "authority on mass communications". He founded the Iowa Writers' Workshop in
Elliott Carter (3,436 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elliott Cook Carter Jr. (December 11, 1908 – November 5, 2012) was an American modernist composer. One of the most respected composers of the second half
Felix M. Keesing (1,032 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Felix M. Keesing (January 5, 1902 – April 1961) was a New Zealand-born anthropologist who specialized in the study of the Philippine Islands and the South
Harold Rosenberg (1,615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harold Rosenberg (February 2, 1906 – July 11, 1978) was an American writer, educator, philosopher and art critic. He coined the term Action Painting in
Allan Nevins (2,388 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Allan Nevins (May 20, 1890 – March 5, 1971) was an American historian and journalist, known for his extensive work on the history of the Civil War
Mary Lee Settle (1,210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary Lee Settle (July 29, 1918 – September 27, 2005) was an American writer. She won the 1978 National Book Award for her novel Blood Tie. She was a founder
W. A. Swanberg (846 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Andrew Swanberg (November 23, 1907 in St. Paul, Minnesota – September 17, 1992 in Southbury, Connecticut) was an American biographer. He is known
John King Fairbank (3,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John King Fairbank (May 24, 1907 – September 14, 1991) was an American historian of China and United States-China relations. He taught at Harvard University
John Vachon (928 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Felix Vachon (May 19, 1914 – April 20, 1975) was an American photographer. He worked as a filing clerk for the Farm Security Administration before
Archibald MacLeish (3,957 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Archibald MacLeish (May 7, 1892 – April 20, 1982) was an American poet and writer, who was associated with the modernist school of poetry. MacLeish studied
Ben Shahn (3,468 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ben Shahn (September 12, 1898 – March 14, 1969) was an American artist. He is best known for his works of social realism, his left-wing political views
Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. (3,932 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arthur Meier Schlesinger Jr. (/ˈʃlɛsɪndʒər/; born Arthur Bancroft Schlesinger; October 15, 1917 – February 28, 2007) was an American historian, social
Herbert Marcuse (5,073 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Herbert Marcuse (/mɑːrˈkuːzə/; German: [maʁˈkuːzə]; July 19, 1898 – July 29, 1979) was a German-American philosopher, sociologist, and political theorist
Edward G. Robinson (4,988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward G. Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg; Yiddish: עמנואל גאָלדנבערג; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was a Romanian-born American actor of stage
Clara G. McMillan (212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Clara Gooding McMillan (August 17, 1894 – November 8, 1976) was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina, and wife of Thomas S. McMillan. Born in Brunson
Calder Willingham (1,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Calder Baynard Willingham Jr. (December 23, 1922 – February 19, 1995) was an American novelist and screenwriter. Before the age of 30, after three novels
Philip Dunne (writer) (2,929 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Philip Ives Dunne (February 11, 1908 – June 2, 1992) was a Hollywood screenwriter, film director and producer, who worked prolifically from 1932 until
Elmo Roper (801 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elmo Burns Roper Jr. (July 31, 1900 in Hebron, Nebraska – April 30, 1971 in Redding, Connecticut) was an American pollster known for his pioneering work
Black Marketing (271 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dramatic propaganda documentary short produced by the United States Office of War Information and directed by William Castle. It is an educational film
Esther Bubley (1,630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Esther Bubley (February 16, 1921 – March 16, 1998) was an American photographer who specialized in expressive photos of ordinary people in everyday lives
John Collier Jr. (2,031 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Collier Jr. (May 22, 1913 – February 25, 1992) was an American anthropologist and an early leader in the fields of visual anthropology and applied
Gardner Cowles Jr. (829 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gardner "Mike" Cowles Jr. (1903–1985) was an American newspaper and magazine publisher. He was co-owner of the Cowles Media Company, whose assets included
Philip Van Doren Stern (1,191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
World War II, he was a member of the planning board of the United States Office of War Information. He was the general manager of the Armed Services Editions
Peter C. Rhodes (1,340 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
who worked for the United Press news service and for the United States Office of War Information. Rhodes was born on September 18, 1909, the son of Christof
William H. Hinton (1,820 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Howard Hinton (Chinese: 韩丁; pinyin: Hán Dīng; February 2, 1919 – May 15, 2004) was an American farmer and writer. A Marxist, he is best known for
Don Hollenbeck (1,615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Don Hollenbeck (March 30, 1905 – June 22, 1954) was a CBS newscaster, commentator, and associate of Edward R. Murrow and Fred W. Friendly. He died from
Bernard Perlin (858 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bernard Perlin was an American painter. He is primarily known for creating pro-war art during World War II and magic realism paintings of urban American
Gordon Parks (6,558 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gordon Roger Alexander Buchanan Parks (November 30, 1912 – March 7, 2006) was an American photographer, musician, writer and film director, who became
David Karr (1,426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
David Harold Karr, born David Katz (1918, Brooklyn, New York – 7 July 1979, Paris) was a controversial American journalist, businessman, Communist and
Armin H. Meyer (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
State University. In 1943, Meyer joined the staff of the United States Office of War Information in Cairo. Assignment Tokyo: An Ambassador's Journal (1974)
Armin H. Meyer (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
State University. In 1943, Meyer joined the staff of the United States Office of War Information in Cairo. Assignment Tokyo: An Ambassador's Journal (1974)
William Harlan Hale (312 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Harlan Hale (1910 – July 1974) was an American writer and journalist, and editor. Hale was born in New York City, the son of William Bayard and
George Fenneman (3,247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Watt Fenneman (November 10, 1919 – May 29, 1997) was an American radio and television announcer. Fenneman is best remembered as the show announcer
George M. A. Hanfmann (556 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Maxim Anossov Hanfmann (born November 1911, in St. Petersburg, Russia; died March 13, 1986, in Watertown, Massachusetts) was a famous archaeologist
Heinz Ansbacher (533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Heinz Ludwig Ansbacher (October 21, 1904 – June 22, 2006) was a German-American psychologist specializing in the theories of Alfred Adler. Ansbacher was
Thomas M. Messer (1,444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Maria Messer (February 9, 1920 – May 15, 2013) was the director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Robert S. Lopez (922 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roberto Sabatino Lopez (October 8, 1910 – July 6, 1986) was an Italian-born American historian of medieval European economic history. He taught for many
Sidney Meyers (2,201 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sidney Meyers (March 9, 1906 – December 4, 1969), also known by the pen name Robert Stebbins was an American film director and editor. Sidney Meyers is
Theodore Tinsley (263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore A. Tinsley (October 27, 1894 – March 3, 1979) was an American author who primarily wrote mystery stories. Tinsley wrote 27 stories featuring The
Ernestine Evans (701 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ernestine Evans (August 9, 1889 – July 3, 1967) was an American journalist, editor, author and literary agent. Born in Omaha, Nebraska, she lived in Elkhart
Arthur Leo Zagat (438 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arthur Leo Zagat (1896–1949) was an American lawyer and writer of pulp fiction and science fiction. Trained in the law, he gave it up to write professionally
Martin Ebon (1,076 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Martin Ebon (May 27, 1917 – February 11, 2006) was the pen-name of Hans Martin Schwarz, a German American journalist and author of non-fiction books and
Leo Hershfield (811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leo Hershfield (1904–1979) was a prominent American illustrator, cartoonist and courtroom artist for NBC News. NBC referred to him as the "Dean of Courtroom
Joseph Fels Barnes (742 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Fels Barnes (1907–1970) was an American journalist, who also served as executive director of the Institute of Pacific Relations (IPR). Barnes was
Peter Sekaer (604 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Peter Sekaer (born Peter Ingemann Sekjær 1901 – 14 July 1950) was a Danish photographer and artist. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, Sekaer came to New York
Polly Shackleton (493 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pauline "Polly" Ehrlich Shackleton (June 19, 1910 – July 14, 1997) was an American Democratic politician in Washington, D.C. She was elected as one of
Emlen Etting (1,905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emlen Pope Etting Jr. (August 24, 1905 – July 20, 1993) was an American painter, sculptor, filmmaker, and member of Philadelphia's elite Main Line Society
Reed Harris (1,216 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Reed Harris (November 5, 1909 – October 15, 1982) was an American writer, publisher, and U.S. government official who served as deputy director of the
Sally Lilienthal (1,006 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sally Ann Lilienthal (March 19, 1919 – October 24, 2006), née Lowengart, was an American nuclear disarmament activist who founded the Ploughshares Fund
John W. Powell (1,589 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John William Powell (July 3, 1919 – December 15, 2008) was a journalist and small business proprietor who was most well known for being tried for sedition
Alvin M. Josephy Jr. (725 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alvin M. Josephy Jr. (May 18, 1915 – October 16, 2005) was an American historian who specialized in Native American issues. New York Times reviewer Herbert
Arthur Siegel (photographer) (335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Arthur Sidney Siegel (August 2, 1913, Detroit – February 1, 1978, Chicago) was an American photographer and educator. Siegel began photographing in the
Frank Edward Brown (1,469 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Frank Edward Brown (b. LaGrange, Illinois, USA, May 24, 1908; d. Marco Island, Florida, February 28, 1988) was a preeminent Mediterranean archaeologist
Lewis Galantière (1,116 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lewis Galantière (October 10, 1895 - February 20, 1977) was a noted American translator, man of letters, and sometime government official. He is particularly
Owen Lattimore (5,591 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Owen Lattimore (July 29, 1900 – May 31, 1989) was an American Orientalist and writer. He was an influential scholar of China and Central Asia, especially
Rachel Bespaloff (320 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rachel Bespaloff (1895-1949) was a Ukrainian-French philosopher. Rachel Bespaloff came from a Ukrainian Jewish family: her father was the Zionist writer
Marion K. Sanders (1,183 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marion Klein Sanders (14 August 1905, Lawrence, Long Island, New York – 16 September 1977, New York, New York) was an American journalist, editor, and
Léo Lania (375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leo Lania (13 August [O.S. 1 August] 1896 – 9 November 1961) was a journalist, playwright and screenwriter. He was born Lazar Herrmann to a Jewish family
H. Harvard Arnason (630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hjorvardur Harvard Arnason (1909 – 1986) was an American academic, administrator, author and art historian focusing on modern art. His most enduring contribution
William L. Holland (533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Lancelot Holland (28 December 1907 – 8 May 2008) worked with the Institute of Pacific Relations from 1928 until 1960 as Research Secretary; American
Alan Barth (820 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alan Barth (1906–1979) was a 20th-century American journalist and author, specializing in civil liberties, best known for his 30-year stint as an editorial
Hazel Gaudet-Erskine (1,452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hazel Gaudet-Erskine (October 15, 1908 — July 10, 1975) was an American social and communications scientist and a member of the Princeton Radio Project
Lewis Wade Jones (452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lewis Wade Jones (March 13, 1910 – September 1979) was a sociologist and teacher. He was born in Cuero, Texas, the son of Wade E. and Lucynthia McDade
Christina Krotkova (137 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christina Krotkova worked in the Office of War Information (OWI) during World War II. The OWI handled war news for domestic use and overseas propaganda
William Golden (graphic designer) (2,160 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Golden (March 31, 1911 – October 23, 1959) was an American graphic designer. He is best known for his work at Columbia Broadcasting System, starting
Richard Plant (writer) (3,018 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Richard Plant (July 22, 1910 – March 3, 1998) was a gay Jewish emigre from Nazi Germany, first to Switzerland and then to the U.S., who became a professor
Julius Epstein (author) (943 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Julius Epstein (1901–1975) was a journalist and scholar, an Austrian Jewish émigré who fled Europe in 1938, worked during World War II in the Office of
Chester Sidney Williams (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chester Sidney Williams (1907–1992) was an American educator and author who wrote extensively about education and freedoms. Williams received a bachelor's
Frances Blakemore (946 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Frances Blakemore (1906-1997; also published as Frances Baker and Frances Wismer) was an American-born artist, author, curator, and art collector who spent
Donald Jason Flamm (652 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Donald J. Flamm (1899–1998) was an American radio pioneer. He worked for the Shubert Brothers and for such stars as Al Jolson and Milton Berle. He owned
Bill Ballantine (illustrator) (1,192 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Bill Ballantine (1910–1999) was an American writer and illustrator of circus subjects, as well as a professional clown. A prolific writer, Ballantine contributed
Elliott Merrick (402 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elliott Merrick (May 11, 1905 - April 22, 1997) was an American author best known for his memoirs about Labrador. He was also an editor, teacher, farmer
Edward P. Lilly (1,123 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Paul Lilly (October 13, 1910 – December 1, 1994) was an American historian, author, educator, and government worker who specialized in the history
Claude-Anne Lopez (811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
[additional citation(s) needed]Claude-Anne Lopez (October 17, 1920 – December 28, 2012), born Claude-Anne Kirschen, was a Belgian-American writer and scholar
Rudolph von Ripper (2,413 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rudolph Charles von Ripper (January 29, 1905 – July 9, 1960) (born Rudolph Carl von Ripper, sometimes Rudolph Ripper), known as 'Rip' or 'Jack the Ripper'
Noma Copley (2,020 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Noma Copley (born Norma Rathner, July 31, 1916 – February 22, 2006) was an American fine arts jeweler and art collector noted for her contributions to
Henry Alsberg (4,180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Garfield Alsberg (Sep. 21, 1881 – Nov. 1, 1970) was an American journalist and writer who served as the founding director of the Federal Writers'
Donald Marquand Dozer (469 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Donald Marquand Dozer (June 7, 1905 - August 4, 1980) was an American scholar of Latin American history. Dozer was born in Zanesville, Ohio, receiving
Burton Paulu (523 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Minnesota. While stationed in London and Luxembourg with the United States Office of War Information during World War II he developed an interest in European
United States Army enlisted rank insignia of World War II (1,116 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Insignia of the Army of the United States", Office of War Information.
Irving Lerner (957 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lerner was an American citizen and an employee of the United States Office of War Information during World War II who worked in the Motion Picture Division
Eugene Jolas (786 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jolas subsequently suspended his editing work to join the United States Office of War Information in 1942; he translated war news into French for Allied
Bessie Breuer (558 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Actors' Studio. During World War II, Breuer worked for the United States Office of War Information. She also wrote for periodicals such as World's Work, House
Propaganda (9,101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the British Political Warfare Executive, as well as the United States Office of War Information. In the early 20th century, the invention of motion pictures
Elmer (917 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Davis (1890–1958), news reporter, author, director of the United States Office of War Information during World War II Elmer Dessens (born 1971), major league
Inno delle nazioni (2,415 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
work was also the centerpiece of a 31-minute film for the United States Office of War Information called Hymn of the Nations, directed by Alexander Hammid
Richard Edes Harrison (921 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harrison, Richard Edes; Council on Books in Wartime; United States; Office of War Information (1944), A War atlas for Americans, OCLC 36139157, retrieved
The Minute Man (3,112 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
on the obverse side A 1940s propaganda poster from the United States Office of War Information encouraging the sale of war bonds The reverse of the Massachusetts
Radio 1212 (699 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
facilities was the Psychological Warfare Branch of the United States Office of War Information (OWI) under the management of CBS radio chief William S
Comfort women (21,010 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
International Relations; not passed. Japanese Comfort Women (1944, United States Office of War Information) Korea official website for sex slaves victims
Thomas Goldstein (historian) (451 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the New York University in 1942 and also worked for the United States Office of War Information, for the Office of German Affairs in the US State Department
Arturo Toscanini (10,055 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
December 1943, Toscanini made a 31-minute film for the United States Office of War Information called Hymn of the Nations, directed by Alexander Hammid