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searching for kunza language 8 found (16 total)

alternate case: Kunza language

Salar de Arizaro (387 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Salar de Arizaro ("Arizaro" comes from Atacameno haâri "crow", "condor" and ara, aro, "accommodation", "place where something is common".) is a large salt
Licancabur (4,722 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Licancabur (Spanish pronunciation: [likaŋkaˈbuɾ]) is a stratovolcano on the border between Bolivia and Chile, south of the Sairecabur volcano and west
Tilocálar (1,816 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tilocálar is a group of volcanoes south of the Salar de Atacama, in Chile. It developed during the Pleistocene and consists of a small lava dome, two vents
Sillajhuay (3,791 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sillajhuay (also known as Sillajguay or Alto Toroni) is a volcano on the border between Bolivia and Chile. It is part of a volcanic chain that stretches
Arackar (471 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arackar licanantay, translates to "bones of the Atacamenians" in the Kunza language. The holotype represents a small individual with a body length estimated
Calama, Chile (1,408 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Calama," but the two main accounts suggest that it comes from the Kunza language, spoken in the past by the Lickan-antay, an ethnic group that resides
Ethnic groups of Argentina (7,349 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Argentina. In the past they spoke a language known as Kunza, to day the Kunza language is an isolate extinct language once spoken Chile, Argentina and Bolivia
Evolution of languages (14,171 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
became extinct. In the Atacama Desert in Chile, the last speaker of Kunza language isolate was found in 1949, with the final shift to Spanish completed